Health & Wellbeing

Five valuable things we learned at the 2018 Not-For-Profit People Conference

The Not-For-Profit People Conference is done for another year. And what a couple of days it was! The atmosphere was electric; the speakers inspiring; and the delegates’ enthusiasm was contagious. It’s difficult to hand-pick the key takeaways from the conference – there were so many with 36 speakers and 23 sessions – so here are […]

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Five things you can do to make work less stressful for your staff – and yourself

Workplace stress

Stress. It’s normal. Every one will feel it at some point, and individuals have their own stress triggers.

At the same time, workplaces have a duty of care to ensure they offer their staff a physically and mentally safe and healthy space in which to work in.

So what could you be doing to ensure that there’s a little less stress in the day for your team, and for yourself?

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Working four-day weeks for five days’ pay? Research shows it pays off

Employees at a New Zealand company behind an innovative trial of a four-day working week have declared it a resounding success, with 78% saying they were better able to manage their work-life balance.

An analysis shows that the employees working four-day weeks felt better about their job, were more engaged, and generally reported greater work-life balance and less stress – all while maintaining the same level of productivity.

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Three reasons you need more plants in your office

Office buildings, where many Australians spend most of their waking hours, can cause real health issues. Cubicles in offices usually consist of partitions made of particle board and vinyl carpet, synthetic flooring, a particle board desk and plastic or synthetic office chair, mostly lit by artificial lighting.

One excellent way to combat both sick days and stress is by filling your office with plants. Ideally, you want plants that will “scrub” the air of pathogens, improve the office’s mix of bacteria, and survive in low light with little care.

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Our top ten posts from 2017

It’s hard to believe that 2017 is almost over! We hope it’s been a great year for you – and that the ideas and perspectives we’ve been able to bring you this year through the Not-For-Profit People Blog and Conference have made a positive impact for you and your organisation’s staff and volunteers.

We’re looking forward to bringing you more organisation-changing ideas to attract, manage, train and retain the very best people in 2018 – but in the meantime, we hope you enjoy taking a look back at our 10 most popular posts of 2017.

Happy and safe holidays!

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Three sources of staff burnout in your NFP – and how to tackle them

Burnout is a common problem in Australian workplaces – and in the NFP sector in particular.

Among the “most at-risk occupations” for mental heath claims, community sector workers – “social and welfare professionals” and “health and welfare support workers” – occupy two of the top five positions.

So do your organisation’s leaders recognise the role that your own processes might be playing in creating a high-stress environment?

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How to tell the difference between a staff member who’s underperforming, and one who’s suffering with their mental health

A key part of any manager’s job is to know how to approach staff who are struggling to do their job to the required standards or expectations.

But with increasing recognition of mental illness in the workplace, before you begin a performance management process with a staff member, it’s important to ask: could this be a mental health problem, rather than a pure performance problem?

And how do you tell the difference?

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Can you ‘teach’ staff to be more emotionally resilient?

You may know someone like this at work: optimistic and resilient, they appear to bounce through challenges drawing on an internal strength that helps them work through problems they encounter at work. Always hopeful and positive about the future, they treat stressful events as a “one-off” situation, appearing to have a built-in buffer that protects them against both ordinary and extraordinary events. Perhaps this is even you.

This sort of emotional resilience is often considered innate. But can it be taught?

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